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Flying Mullet
11-13-2009, 03:56 PM
The word "got" is an abomination of the English language that uneducated dolts use when they don't possess the vocabulary to properly express themselves.

Some examples:

I got the new copy of Final Fantasy.
I got the Swine Flu.
I've got a bad cough.

You don't "got" any of those. What you've "got" is poor command of the English language.

Acceptable versions:

I bought the new copy of Final Fantasy.
I caught the Swine Flu.
I have a bad cough. (I have got a bad cough? That's ludicrous!)

If you haven't guessed, it's started grating on me lately when people substitute "got" for a more meaningful word and I'm working on removing it, or at least severely trimming it, from my daily use.

Christmas
11-13-2009, 03:57 PM
CUM? :bigsmile:

Breine
11-13-2009, 04:01 PM
'tis a pretty unnecessary word, indeed :holmes:

Levian
11-13-2009, 04:05 PM
I have caught milk on my upper lip?

Just trying to learn here.

Flying Mullet
11-13-2009, 04:11 PM
"I have milk on my upper lip."

You never "have got" anything. When people say "I've got..." It's the contraction of "I have got..." which is just silly.

Badge
11-13-2009, 04:20 PM
Yay, someone else who hates British Grammar too.

I am a culprit of it though.

Facebook makes me cry because people just can't speak English!

Yar
11-13-2009, 04:26 PM
gotten. :bigsmile:

Elly
11-13-2009, 04:28 PM
it's just as bad as those people that replace have with of... i should of, no you should have or should've, kids now just don't know how to properly use contractions, and all too often just butcher the english language... sadly though it's not only kids anymore...

Jessweeee♪
11-13-2009, 04:50 PM
I aint' needin' you learnin' me no grammar lessons.

Duce of Daggers
11-13-2009, 04:59 PM
The word "got" is an abomination of the English language that uneducated dolts use when they don't possess the vocabulary to properly express themselves.




why do ya gots ter insult me:cry:

rubah
11-13-2009, 05:42 PM
mulley's got a bone to pick obv.

Shoeberto
11-13-2009, 05:55 PM
I've always kind of wondered about the usage of "have got." Usually in formal papers during revisions I would notice how often I would write "they've got" or something, then try to get rid of the contraction, and then notice how awful "they have got" sounds. Grammar is weird.

Flying Mullet
11-13-2009, 06:17 PM
I've always kind of wondered about the usage of "have got." Usually in formal papers during revisions I would notice how often I would write "they've got" or something, then try to get rid of the contraction, and then notice how awful "they have got" sounds. Grammar is weird.
Exactly! Hence...

mulley's got has a bone to pick obv.

LunarWeaver
11-13-2009, 06:59 PM
Let's say my woman refuses to cook anymore. I beat her, obviously, and the next day she has the gall to run away. I then must hang my head out the window, shake my fist, and yell "I'll get you yet!" Sure, I have words like vengeance at my disposal, but this is a fist shake situation.

Well, once I kill her I have to keep it even! Since I previously said get, now I must say "At long last, I got her!" It's informal but must be done.

Bunny
11-13-2009, 07:12 PM
I got the Final Fantasy Swine Flu cough.

Raistlin
11-13-2009, 07:12 PM
Didn't I see you mention that you "could care less" about something when you meant the exact opposite? Learn to grammar yourself, hypocrite!

Flying Mullet
11-13-2009, 07:25 PM
Let's say my woman refuses to cook anymore. I beat her, obviously, and the next day she has the gall to run away. I then must hang my head out the window, shake my fist, and yell "I'll get you yet!" Sure, I have words like vengeance at my disposal, but this is a fist shake situation.

Well, once I kill her I have to keep it even! Since I previously said get, now I must say "At long last, I got her!" It's informal but must be done.
No, you'd say, "At long last, I killed her!" :p

Didn't I see you mention that you "could care less" about something when you meant the exact opposite? Learn to grammar yourself, hypocrite!
I'll hypocrite you, grammar! :smash:

rubah
11-13-2009, 07:27 PM
I'm fixing to get Mulley.

Flying Mullet
11-13-2009, 07:36 PM
I'm fixin' to get got. :cry:

Ace Protorney
11-13-2009, 09:31 PM
The word "got" has many uses, hence why a lot of people tend to overuse the word in their sentences. "But why?" you may ask. Rather simply, because it's easy to remember, and people are lazy to use another word when "got" can be used in place.

You sir have provided several great examples of why people would use the word "got" instead of other words, yet you still deem the word an "abomination." Exactly, why is it one? Because of it's many uses? Perhaps so. Let's determine that the word "got" is now banned, would people find other ways to express how to say what they want without it? Of course they can, they just need to learn how to. Once they've got (Haha, did you see what I did there, Mullet?) the idea that "got" is appropriate, there's no way you can't get people to stop using the word when another word can be use.

LunarWeaver
11-13-2009, 10:31 PM
Let's say my woman refuses to cook anymore. I beat her, obviously, and the next day she has the gall to run away. I then must hang my head out the window, shake my fist, and yell "I'll get you yet!" Sure, I have words like vengeance at my disposal, but this is a fist shake situation.

Well, once I kill her I have to keep it even! Since I previously said get, now I must say "At long last, I got her!" It's informal but must be done.
No, you'd say, "At long last, I killed her!" :p

I can't say killed! That's all appropriate and such :colbert: You don't understand villains at all.

Tavrobel
11-13-2009, 10:57 PM
That girl's got a nice ass.

YOU HEARD ME

NorthernChaosGod
11-14-2009, 12:28 AM
I got five on it! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJzIYv_mE04)

Mogi
11-14-2009, 12:53 AM
Under only specific extraneous circumstances do you end a sentence in a preposition, and even in those circumstances is it possible to avoid the mistake.

I contributed~
:bounce:

Barraza
11-14-2009, 03:10 AM
Surely there is a time and a place for such a small yet significant word.

Please give me a sentence where I might use it without offending you, Flying Mullet.

rubah
11-14-2009, 03:18 AM
Mullet begot his one and only son after a hard night's drinking.

Anaralia
11-14-2009, 05:18 AM
I got the new copy of Final Fantasy.
I got the Swine Flu.
I've got a bad cough.

I'm honestly confused. These are all correct, grammatically, aren't they? They may be lazy and could be rephrased with better words, but aren't they correct, regardless? I don't always feel like saying "I OBTAINED the flu last year and it blew chunks."

~*~Celes~*~
11-14-2009, 05:41 AM
i love you too mulley

Rase
11-14-2009, 06:04 AM
I got bored in grammar class.

Dignified Pauper
11-14-2009, 06:34 AM
I got what Mullet is trying to say, but I don't think I got why I should care.

Montoya
11-14-2009, 06:51 AM
I got it now. :eek:

Jiro
11-14-2009, 11:39 AM
While reading this thread, I went from being impartial to hating it to liking and then finally back to being impartial. It's got its uses. There are other words that could be cut out too, but I'm too lazy to care.

Raistlin
11-14-2009, 04:24 PM
I'm honestly confused. These are all correct, grammatically, aren't they? They may be lazy and could be rephrased with better words, but aren't they correct, regardless? I don't always feel like saying "I OBTAINED the flu last year and it blew chunks."

Using "got" is approximately as correct as using "ain't." Meaning that it's perfectly fine to use it in an informal setting, but such colloquial terms should be avoided in more formal papers.

rubah
11-14-2009, 06:18 PM
oh man, I got to go edit all my formal papers now...

Duce of Daggers
11-15-2009, 03:44 PM
I'm honestly confused. These are all correct, grammatically, aren't they? They may be lazy and could be rephrased with better words, but aren't they correct, regardless? I don't always feel like saying "I OBTAINED the flu last year and it blew chunks."

Using "got" is approximately as correct as using "ain't." Meaning that it's perfectly fine to use it in an informal setting, but such colloquial terms should be avoided in more formal papers.

Instead of "OBTAINED" try "had".

Mirage
11-15-2009, 03:55 PM
Got it.

Anaralia
11-15-2009, 06:24 PM
Ok, I got it too. And obtained is an awesome, underused word. I am going to use it in three sentences today.

Mirage
11-16-2009, 10:38 AM
Also take note of the word "gobbeldegook". I like it! I want to use it in conversations more often!