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View Full Version : I own that scone!/That scone is gone!: The Great Debate



Mr. Carnelian
07-22-2015, 12:15 PM
Finally, the question which has dominated culinary discussion in Britain for countless ages will be resolved.

WHICH IS IT?!

Formalhaut
07-22-2015, 12:40 PM
I actually say both, but I guess I say "own" slightly more often than not.

Mr. Carnelian
07-22-2015, 12:43 PM
I actually say both, but I guess I say "own" slightly more often than not.

I realise that people may sometimes say one, and sometimes the other. I'm like that as well.

But, if I put a "both" option in the poll, this vital issue would never be resolved! :monocle:

Night Fury
07-22-2015, 12:59 PM
John Scone.

FFNut
07-22-2015, 01:08 PM
I'm Canadian, what's a scone?

Pheesh
07-22-2015, 01:14 PM
I usually say the gone variation. But I've been known to say it the other way if I'm feeling particularly uppity.

Mr. Carnelian
07-22-2015, 01:18 PM
I'm Canadian, what's a scone?

It's looks like this.
http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/sites/bbcgoodfood.com/files/recipe_images/recipe-image-legacy-id--1001500_10.jpg

They're generally eaten with clotted cream and/or jam.

They may have raisins or sultanas in them. They might be sweet, or savoury.

One should eat scones with cream tea.

Pheesh
07-22-2015, 01:19 PM
Warm scone with some butter on it is all I need. Leave your nasty fruit mush at home.

Night Fury
07-22-2015, 01:19 PM
Don't forget cheese scones!

Mr. Carnelian
07-22-2015, 01:19 PM
I usually say the gone variation. But I've been known to say it the other way if I'm feeling particularly uppity.

Pick a side! There can be no compromise! :argh:


Don't forget cheese scones!

Indeed, as I mentioned scones can be sweet or savoury.

Cheese scones can also be eaten with clotted cream and jam, but I would generally have them with butter.

Pheesh
07-22-2015, 01:20 PM
I usually say the gone variation. But I've been known to say it the other way if I'm feeling particularly uppity.

Pick a side! There can be no compromise! :argh:

80% gone, 20% own. That's the best you'll get from me!

Mr. Carnelian
07-22-2015, 01:23 PM
I usually say the gone variation. But I've been known to say it the other way if I'm feeling particularly uppity.

Pick a side! There can be no compromise! :argh:

80% gone, 20% own. That's the best you'll get from me!

If you don't vote one way or the other in the poll, how will we ever resolve this issue which is tearing Britain apart?!

HOOOOOW?! :hot:

FFNut
07-22-2015, 01:51 PM
They look like biscuits. Hot butter and gravy is the way to go!

Shauna
07-22-2015, 02:00 PM
Only "own" when I'm taking the piss, "on" erry other time.

sharkythesharkdogg
07-22-2015, 02:51 PM
They look like biscuits. Hot butter and gravy is the way to go!

AH HAAA!!! A Canadian who knows what biscuits are, and eats them with gravy. I knew they existed.

I shall inform the girlfriend post haste.

Also, I've always heard it pronounced "scown" so that's how I've always said it.

Formalhaut
07-22-2015, 03:12 PM
I'm Canadian, what's a scone?

It's looks like this.
http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/sites/bbcgoodfood.com/files/recipe_images/recipe-image-legacy-id--1001500_10.jpg

They're generally eaten with clotted cream and/or jam.

They may have raisins or sultanas in them. They might be sweet, or savoury.

One should eat scones with cream tea.

Oh goodness, now you've brought up the other​ age old debate: do you put the jam on first or the clotted cream?

Mr. Carnelian
07-22-2015, 03:28 PM
Also, I've always heard it pronounced "scown" so that's how I've always said it.

I'd completely forgotten about that pronunciation.

It's definitely a very niche, not widely-spoken one.


They look like biscuits. Hot butter and gravy is the way to go!

BLASPHEMY! :hot:

If you suggested that in Devon or Cornwall, you would be lynched.

Scones are a sort of crumbly bread, NOT biscuits.

Bubba
07-22-2015, 04:21 PM
John Scone.

You know nothing...


They look like biscuits. Hot butter and gravy is the way to go!

No. Just no.


Only "own" when I'm taking the piss, "on" erry other time.

Exactly.

Night Fury
07-22-2015, 04:26 PM
Also, I've always heard it pronounced "scown" so that's how I've always said it.

I'd completely forgotten about that pronunciation.

It's definitely a very niche, not widely-spoken one.


Isn't 'Scown' (like clown) also how one would say 'idiot' in Na'vi?

Because if you are saying scown (like clown) then that is what you are.

Shorty
07-22-2015, 06:04 PM
Own.

sharkythesharkdogg
07-22-2015, 08:24 PM
Also, I've always heard it pronounced "scown" so that's how I've always said it.

I'd completely forgotten about that pronunciation.

It's definitely a very niche, not widely-spoken one.


Isn't 'Scown' (like clown) also how one would say 'idiot' in Na'vi?

Because if you are saying scown (like clown) then that is what you are.

Haha. No, I didn't mean like clown. I meant "scown" as in combining the word own with sc. Like the first pronunciation mentioned in the thread.

There are people who pronounce it like clown/down/frown? Weird.

Night Fury
07-22-2015, 08:28 PM
Well, Carny seems to think so xD

FFNut
07-22-2015, 08:50 PM
I still say fresh out of the oven, melted butter with gravy. The thing is a biscuit.

Mr. Carnelian
07-22-2015, 09:36 PM
Haha. No, I didn't mean like clown. I meant "scown" as in combining the word own with sc. Like the first pronunciation mentioned in the thread.

There are people who pronounce it like clown/down/frown? Weird.

There are. I remember it coming up in my History of the English Language module, in my first year of Uni.


I still say fresh out of the oven, melted butter with gravy. The thing is a biscuit.

HERESY! BLASPHEMY! OBSCENITY! :hot:

If you don't watch yourself, I'll tell Devonshire what you've been saying about scones, and they'll all come get you! :argh:

Steve
07-23-2015, 12:31 AM
I pronounce it the latter, that scone is gone. However, due to my London accent it's much more like saying Cone with an S in front.

American dinner biscuit is to my knowledge a more savoury and dry affair. Scones, are by nature very sweet and terribly (read delightfully) butter rich cakes. How does one differentiate between a cake and a biscuit? Well biscuits when fresh are crisp and crumbly, when they go stale they become rather soggy textured. They don't taste as crisp which leaves you disappointed. A cake on the other hand is soft and becomes hard when stale much like bread. This leaves you fearing for the safety of your teeth as you bite in to them and most certainly highly disappointed. Scones belong at afternoon tea, not in your supper, now we'll forget your transgressions and if you're lucky, introduce you to the delights of afternoon tea in the future.

They should be eaten with clotted cream (preferably, though very stiff double cream will do in a pinch. Whip it properly boy, don't you dare use any aerosol trout) and some jam. Eating them plain (don't ask me how people do plain, due to their quite heavy, crumbly texture they have the ability to act like a Cream Cracker to your mouth leaving behind the same cemented shut feeling on your teeth due to crumbs mixed with saliva bonding to all available surfaces). Alternatively, it is known to see them served spread with butter however, it is not the traditional way of consuming these cakes due to the already high butter content. The answer to the other debate (jam or cream first) is thus:

The jam should always be applied first. No arguments, it's like putting the toilet paper on the holder; there is a right way and a wrong way. Cream first is simply put bloody wrong. Here's why:

If you put the cream on first then much like the toilet paper being so it tears off from the back you don't actually have a good clean estimate of how much you have or need when it comes to applying the jam (or wiping your arse to continue the analogy) you end up having to put far more on than required (or tear more off) because you have a surface to spread it on which has far more give and slip (or you just can't smurfing see the thing). This leaves you dissatisfied with both an uneven covering of jam and an overly sweet experience dripping in sugar (or a blocked drain in your toilet which no one wants to break up for fear of the trout being still there)

If however, you do it right, you apply the Jam first (or hang your toilet paper so the tear perforations are on the front of the roll) you can apply the right amount of Jam to ensure maximum coverage and minimum overdoing it. You can then pile a generous helping of clotted cream on top using the adhesive quality of the jam to aid you in the process of applying it. (This is akin to being able to determine exactly how many pieces of toilet paper is enough by cleanly counting in your head). This leads to great satisfaction for the consumer and a relief that they have done things right (they're also not scrabbling for the end of the toilet roll, it is after all in plain view).

Ladies and gentleman. When it takes a man from Finchley to put you all bloody straight on Scones, you know one thing: You're simply not very classy.

Shorty
07-23-2015, 12:39 AM
I pronounce it the latter, that scone is gone. However, due to my London accent it's much more like saying Cone with an S in front.

American dinner biscuit is to my knowledge a more savoury and dry affair. Scones, are by nature very sweet and terribly (read delightfully) butter rich cakes. How does one differentiate between a cake and a biscuit? Well biscuits when fresh are crisp and crumbly, when they go stale they become rather soggy textured. They don't taste as crisp which leaves you disappointed. A cake on the other hand is soft and becomes hard when stale much like bread. This leaves you fearing for the safety of your teeth as you bite in to them and most certainly highly disappointed. Scones belong at afternoon tea, not in your supper, now we'll forget your transgressions and if you're lucky, introduce you to the delights of afternoon tea in the future.

They should be eaten with clotted cream (preferably, though very stiff double cream will do in a pinch. Whip it properly boy, don't you dare use any aerosol trout) and some jam. Eating them plain (don't ask me how people do plain, due to their quite heavy, crumbly texture they have the ability to act like a Cream Cracker to your mouth leaving behind the same cemented shut feeling on your teeth due to crumbs mixed with saliva bonding to all available surfaces). Alternatively, it is known to see them served spread with butter however, it is not the traditional way of consuming these cakes due to the already high butter content. The answer to the other debate (jam or cream first) is thus:

The jam should always be applied first. No arguments, it's like putting the toilet paper on the holder; there is a right way and a wrong way. Cream first is simply put bloody wrong. Here's why:

If you put the cream on first then much like the toilet paper being so it tears off from the back you don't actually have a good clean estimate of how much you have or need when it comes to applying the jam (or wiping your arse to continue the analogy) you end up having to put far more on than required (or tear more off) because you have a surface to spread it on which has far more give and slip (or you just can't smurfing see the thing). This leaves you dissatisfied with both an uneven covering of jam and an overly sweet experience dripping in sugar (or a blocked drain in your toilet which no one wants to break up for fear of the trout being still there)

If however, you do it right, you apply the Jam first (or hang your toilet paper so the tear perforations are on the front of the roll) you can apply the right amount of Jam to ensure maximum coverage and minimum overdoing it. You can then pile a generous helping of clotted cream on top using the adhesive quality of the jam to aid you in the process of applying it. (This is akin to being able to determine exactly how many pieces of toilet paper is enough by cleanly counting in your head). This leads to great satisfaction for the consumer and a relief that they have done things right (they're also not scrabbling for the end of the toilet roll, it is after all in plain view).

Ladies and gentleman. When it takes a man from Finchley to put you all bloody straight on Scones, you know one thing: You're simply not very classy.

You're right, Steve. It took seven paragraphs about the precise and delicate art of properly identifying and safely consuming scones to put the rest of us in our places. You are much classier than we are.

Mr. Carnelian
07-23-2015, 01:56 AM
The jam should always be applied first. No arguments, it's like putting the toilet paper on the holder; there is a right way and a wrong way. Cream first is simply put bloody wrong. Here's why:

If you put the cream on first then much like the toilet paper being so it tears off from the back you don't actually have a good clean estimate of how much you have or need when it comes to applying the jam (or wiping your arse to continue the analogy) you end up having to put far more on than required (or tear more off) because you have a surface to spread it on which has far more give and slip (or you just can't smurfing see the thing). This leaves you dissatisfied with both an uneven covering of jam and an overly sweet experience dripping in sugar (or a blocked drain in your toilet which no one wants to break up for fear of the trout being still there)

If however, you do it right, you apply the Jam first (or hang your toilet paper so the tear perforations are on the front of the roll) you can apply the right amount of Jam to ensure maximum coverage and minimum overdoing it. You can then pile a generous helping of clotted cream on top using the adhesive quality of the jam to aid you in the process of applying it. (This is akin to being able to determine exactly how many pieces of toilet paper is enough by cleanly counting in your head). This leads to great satisfaction for the consumer and a relief that they have done things right (they're also not scrabbling for the end of the toilet roll, it is after all in plain view).

Ladies and gentleman. When it takes a man from Finchley to put you all bloody straight on Scones, you know one thing: You're simply not very classy.

No, no, no, no, no, no. :nonono:

You apply both jam and clotted cream at the SAME TIME. Have I blown your mind? :whoa:

You cut the scone into two equal halves. You apply jam to one half, and clotted cream to the other half. You then put the two halves back together. :monocle:

Denmark
07-23-2015, 02:05 AM
I pronounce it "scone".

Steve
07-23-2015, 02:17 AM
The jam should always be applied first. No arguments, it's like putting the toilet paper on the holder; there is a right way and a wrong way. Cream first is simply put bloody wrong. Here's why:

If you put the cream on first then much like the toilet paper being so it tears off from the back you don't actually have a good clean estimate of how much you have or need when it comes to applying the jam (or wiping your arse to continue the analogy) you end up having to put far more on than required (or tear more off) because you have a surface to spread it on which has far more give and slip (or you just can't smurfing see the thing). This leaves you dissatisfied with both an uneven covering of jam and an overly sweet experience dripping in sugar (or a blocked drain in your toilet which no one wants to break up for fear of the trout being still there)

If however, you do it right, you apply the Jam first (or hang your toilet paper so the tear perforations are on the front of the roll) you can apply the right amount of Jam to ensure maximum coverage and minimum overdoing it. You can then pile a generous helping of clotted cream on top using the adhesive quality of the jam to aid you in the process of applying it. (This is akin to being able to determine exactly how many pieces of toilet paper is enough by cleanly counting in your head). This leads to great satisfaction for the consumer and a relief that they have done things right (they're also not scrabbling for the end of the toilet roll, it is after all in plain view).

Ladies and gentleman. When it takes a man from Finchley to put you all bloody straight on Scones, you know one thing: You're simply not very classy.

No, no, no, no, no, no. :nonono:

You apply both jam and clotted cream at the SAME TIME. Have I blown your mind? :whoa:

You cut the scone into two equal halves. You apply jam to one half, and clotted cream to the other half. You then put the two halves back together. :monocle:

You have failed this country!

Now that my Oliver Queen moment is over. You're wrong because then you have to fit the whole scone in your mouth. Now, this may be socially acceptable with say a donut, or similar it is not proper etiquette for eating a Scone. Scones are eaten in halves. As such you should not sandwich them together. Even putting the poor etiquette aside, you have encountered a trap. The trap being that if you do that, sandwich them together, you get less cream and jam per scone. That's simply the worst idea when it comes to eating a scone. Ok, so maybe not as bad as butter and hot gravy but I must say, it's close.

Additionally, Shorty... yes indeed you know you're not classy at all but that's ok. It's why we love you.

Mr. Carnelian
07-23-2015, 02:23 AM
You're wrong because then you have to fit the whole scone in your mouth. Now, this may be socially acceptable with say a donut, or similar it is not proper etiquette for eating a Scone. Scones are eaten in halves. As such you should not sandwich them together. Even putting the poor etiquette aside, you have encountered a trap. The trap being that if you do that, sandwich them together, you get less cream and jam per scone. That's simply the worst idea when it comes to eating a scone. Ok, so maybe not as bad as butter and hot gravy but I must say, it's close.

Ah, but that's when it gets clever! :spin:

You have a choice of eating the whole scone if you're not in polite company (scones should be small enough to fit in your mouth whole. If not, then they're too large).

Or, you can have one half with just jam, and the other with just clotted cream. You can eat them one at at a time, or alternate between a bite of jam scone and a bite of clotted cream scone.

The third option is that you can smush the two halves together so that the jam half gets clotted cream on it, and the clotted cream half gets jam on it. Then, you can separate them and you have two halves which have both jam and clotted cream on them.

:cool:

Formalhaut
07-23-2015, 02:30 AM
Ah, but that's when it gets clever! :spin:

You have a choice of eating the whole scone if you're not in polite company (scones should be small enough to fit in your mouth whole. If not, then they're too large).

Or, you can have one half with just jam, and the other with just clotted cream. You can eat them one at at a time, or alternate between a bite of jam scone and a bite of clotted cream scone.

The third option is that you can smush the two halves together so that the jam half gets clotted cream on it, and the clotted cream half gets jam on it. Then, you can separate them and you have two halves which have both jam and clotted cream on them.

:cool:

If you think he's this posh on-line, just wait until you meet him...

... I have to LIVE with this. :spin:

Pheesh
07-23-2015, 03:34 AM
You're wrong because then you have to fit the whole scone in your mouth. Now, this may be socially acceptable with say a donut, or similar it is not proper etiquette for eating a Scone. Scones are eaten in halves. As such you should not sandwich them together. Even putting the poor etiquette aside, you have encountered a trap. The trap being that if you do that, sandwich them together, you get less cream and jam per scone. That's simply the worst idea when it comes to eating a scone. Ok, so maybe not as bad as butter and hot gravy but I must say, it's close.

Ah, but that's when it gets clever! :spin:

You have a choice of eating the whole scone if you're not in polite company (scones should be small enough to fit in your mouth whole. If not, then they're too large).

Or, you can have one half with just jam, and the other with just clotted cream. You can eat them one at at a time, or alternate between a bite of jam scone and a bite of clotted cream scone.

The third option is that you can smush the two halves together so that the jam half gets clotted cream on it, and the clotted cream half gets jam on it. Then, you can separate them and you have two halves which have both jam and clotted cream on them.

:cool:

You literally just made up the part about the scone having to be small, or someone had misinformed you. Baking competitions have measurements for these things and both halves of a 'perfect scone' would not fit classily into your mouth. If a scone is flat enough to do that then you've either cut it too small in diameter (tbf, Night Fury makes mini scones like that and they are smurfing delicious) or it hasn't risen enough in the baking process, meaning it'll be unusually dense.

Don't smurf with someone whose girlfriend makes him watch that much Great British/Australian Bake Off.

fire_of_avalon
07-23-2015, 05:27 AM
They look like biscuits. Hot butter and gravy is the way to go!
Yes. This is correct. Those photos are biscuits. Not the kind you say are biscuits which are actually cookies, but real biscuits. Murca biscuits.



Also, I've always heard it pronounced "scown" so that's how I've always said it.
I definitely read this like "frown" and am judging you, even though you clarified yourself later.


I still say fresh out of the oven, melted butter with gravy. The thing is a biscuit.
You just get better and better, don't you?

A scone is totally different than a biscuit and the thing in those photos is a biscuit.

Also, I am a biscuit girl all the way down to my toes. Don't try to tell me a biscuit is a scone. I will declare war on you. I have some infantry. They're toddlers. They will destroy you.

Pheesh
07-23-2015, 05:51 AM
I had a 'biscuit' when I was in America a few times and it really tasted dry, dense and horrible. So if I had to guess the difference between the two: A scone is crumbly, delicious and satisfying, and a biscuit turns into some horrible mushy glue like substance that sticks to the roof of your mouth.

fire_of_avalon
07-23-2015, 05:58 AM
If I recall correctly, you didn't spend much time in the southeast. So you don't know SHIT about biscuits, bes' fran. I'm ashamed of you.

I will make you a delicious, fluffy, butter biscuit and you will take them to your home country. Biscuits will rule the world. It will be glorious. All hail the biscuit overlord.

Shorty
07-23-2015, 06:06 AM
how does it feel having your sconesy ass handed to you by an Australian steven

Pheesh
07-23-2015, 06:11 AM
If I recall correctly, you didn't spend much time in the southeast. So you don't know trout about biscuits, bes' fran. I'm ashamed of you.

I will make you a delicious, fluffy, butter biscuit and you will take them to your home country. Biscuits will rule the world. It will be glorious. All hail the biscuit overlord.

Well when it comes to food I'm always willing to have my mind changed. Just promise that if I still don't like them you won't go 'full southerner' and hang me up by my britches or make me compete in a rodeo >.>


how does it feel having your sconesy ass handed to you by an Australian steven

I hate to say it dear but I think I was kinda agreeing with Steve more than anything. I know, I hate myself right now, too u_u

Shorty
07-23-2015, 06:12 AM
What is happening in this world!

Pheesh
07-23-2015, 06:15 AM
If it helps, I don't know what the smurf he was on about with the toilet paper thing. Assumedly he eats scones while taking a dump or something? :/

Night Fury
07-23-2015, 09:34 AM
I had a huge scone last week with blackcurrant jam and clotted cream. It was the bomb. It was part of an afternoon tea tier selection. I could have just eaten a few of these bad boys.

I put the jam on, then the cream on top and it gets a little messy but oh so gooooooood.

http://home.eyesonff.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=65352&stc=1

Mr. Carnelian
07-23-2015, 12:13 PM
You literally just made up the part about the scone having to be small, or someone had misinformed you. Baking competitions have measurements for these things and both halves of a 'perfect scone' would not fit classily into your mouth. If a scone is flat enough to do that then you've either cut it too small in diameter (tbf, Night Fury makes mini scones like that and they are smurfing delicious) or it hasn't risen enough in the baking process, meaning it'll be unusually dense.

Don't smurf with someone whose girlfriend makes him watch that much Great British/Australian Bake Off.

Sir, I think that you misapprehend me! :monocle: I didn't mean to say that you should have to fit all of the scone into your mouth at once.

Rather, I meant to convey that it should be of such thickness that one can take a whole bite of it at once. I'm not sure that explanation is any better, but it's the best I can manage without an accompanying demonstration.

Just to clarify, I don't mean to make this into a big THING. Everyone can eat their own scones however they choose. :spin:

Formalhaut
07-23-2015, 12:17 PM
Rather, I meant to convey that it should be of such thickness that one can take a whole bite of it at once. I'm not sure that explanation is any better, but it's the best I can manage without an accompanying demonstration.

I'm still utterly butterly confused. I think a demonstration of your scone eating technique is needed here.

Pheesh
07-23-2015, 12:27 PM
I get what you're saying. A scone shouldn't be that thin though was my point, if it's that thin then it's either smaller in diameter than a regular scone or it hasn't risen properly and is going to be very dense.

And I DID mean to make this into a big thing :hot::hot:

Mr. Carnelian
07-23-2015, 12:31 PM
I think that this is detracting from the central issue, which is the VITALLY important question of "own" vs "gone".

Pick a side, Pheesh! :roll:

Pheesh
07-23-2015, 12:34 PM
I'm waiting to see if Loony BoB has some really weird argument to make about the whole naming thing before I pick a side.

No doubt he's going to come in here batting for the 'rhymes with clown' side.

Bubba
07-23-2015, 01:32 PM
A scone shouldn't be that thin though was my point, if it's that thin then it's either smaller in diameter than a regular scone or it hasn't risen properly and is going to be very dense.

If a scone was that thin... would it then be classified as a biscuit?

Mr. Carnelian
07-23-2015, 03:14 PM
A scone shouldn't be that thin though was my point, if it's that thin then it's either smaller in diameter than a regular scone or it hasn't risen properly and is going to be very dense.

If a scone was that thin... would it then be classified as a biscuit?

:roll2

sharkythesharkdogg
07-24-2015, 01:58 PM
Seriously though, you've heard people pronounce scone like frown?

What accent is that one?

What about pronouncing it like the number one? Is that a thing? That's weird. I hope it's a thing.

Shauna
07-24-2015, 02:11 PM
Seriously though, you've heard people pronounce scone like frown?

What accent is that one?

Some English people are weird. It's probably just an extension of how weird they pronounce "own".

Psychotic
07-24-2015, 02:39 PM
I go with own. I am northern on some pronunciations, southern on others. This is one where I'm southern I guess. Midlands for life.

Mr. Carnelian
07-24-2015, 07:50 PM
Seriously though, you've heard people pronounce scone like frown?

What accent is that one?

Some English people are weird. It's probably just an extension of how weird they pronounce "own".

You Scots can't talk. One of the Scottish variations is "scoon". :p

Anyway, scone as "scown" rhyming with "gown" is an archaic pronunciation which - as far as I'm aware - is no longer in use.

Pumpkin
07-24-2015, 07:54 PM
I had a 'biscuit' when I was in America a few times and it really tasted dry, dense and horrible. So if I had to guess the difference between the two: A scone is crumbly, delicious and satisfying, and a biscuit turns into some horrible mushy glue like substance that sticks to the roof of your mouth.

I hate biscuits for this exact reason. That and it manages to be gluey and fall apart so you're stuck trying to eat like globs/crumbs instead of a well put together piece of bread. And yes foa, I'm in the southeast and I have tried a bunch of them and I wanted to like them but they are awful.

I pronounce it like own

Shauna
07-24-2015, 07:55 PM
Except nobody in Scotland says "scoon" so.

Mr. Carnelian
07-24-2015, 08:00 PM
Except nobody in Scotland says "scoon" so.

I never said it was CURRENT. :p

It's another one which I learned about in History of the English Language, so it's probably not in modern usage. :spin:

Jinx
07-24-2015, 08:18 PM
Can someone explain to me what clotted cream is? Is it not just butter?

fire_of_avalon
07-25-2015, 12:49 AM
I had a 'biscuit' when I was in America a few times and it really tasted dry, dense and horrible. So if I had to guess the difference between the two: A scone is crumbly, delicious and satisfying, and a biscuit turns into some horrible mushy glue like substance that sticks to the roof of your mouth.

I hate biscuits for this exact reason. That and it manages to be gluey and fall apart so you're stuck trying to eat like globs/crumbs instead of a well put together piece of bread. And yes foa, I'm in the southeast and I have tried a bunch of them and I wanted to like them but they are awful.
Then something is wrong.

Can someone explain to me what clotted cream is? Is it not just butter?
I keep imagining like regular cream with clots in it going through some kind of tube. Like a blood clot. But of cream.

TBH kind of disgusted.

Shauna
07-25-2015, 12:59 AM
It's like really thick cream, to the point that it's not pourable or anything.

FFNut
07-25-2015, 02:00 AM
Like cake icing, is that clotted cream?

Shauna
07-25-2015, 02:02 AM
No. Because that's icing. This is just really thick cream.

Jinx
07-25-2015, 02:06 AM
Heavy cream tastes so fucking good.

Shauna
07-25-2015, 02:10 AM
Heavy cream still seems to be fairly pourable. You literally cannot pour clotted cream.

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01888/Cream_1888235i.jpg

This is how thick we're talking here. You need to spoon it out.

Jinx
07-25-2015, 02:46 AM
Well OBVIOUSLY, because it's CLOTTED.

I'm just saying that heavy cream tastes amazing, so clotted cream is probably amazing too.

fire_of_avalon
07-25-2015, 03:59 AM
It looks like butter. I think you guys just made some soft butter and tried to.get all fancy ass about it.

I like butter and jam on my biscuits too tho, no judgement.

Mr. Carnelian
07-25-2015, 10:44 AM
It looks like butter. I think you guys just made some soft butter and tried to.get all fancy ass about it.

I like butter and jam on my biscuits too tho, no judgement.

I swear, if I told the people of Devonshire what outrageous slander was being said about their favourite foodstuff, they'd hunt down all of you one by one.

Shauna
07-25-2015, 11:17 AM
Well OBVIOUSLY, because it's CLOTTED.

I'm just saying that heavy cream tastes amazing, so clotted cream is probably amazing too.

Oh right. Yeah. It just tastes like cream. Except it's spreadable. So if you like cream you're probably gonna like clotted cream.

fire_of_avalon
07-26-2015, 03:53 AM
It looks like butter. I think you guys just made some soft butter and tried to.get all fancy ass about it.

I like butter and jam on my biscuits too tho, no judgement.

I swear, if I told the people of Devonshire what outrageous slander was being said about their favourite foodstuff, they'd hunt down all of you one by one.

Let them come.

Jinx
07-26-2015, 03:56 AM
It looks like butter. I think you guys just made some soft butter and tried to.get all fancy ass about it.

I like butter and jam on my biscuits too tho, no judgement.

I swear, if I told the people of Devonshire what outrageous slander was being said about their favourite foodstuff, they'd hunt down all of you one by one.

You keep saying that, but I don't think anyone is particularly threatened. All I've gotten is that Devonites? Devanians? are pansy asses.

Shauna
07-26-2015, 11:16 AM
They are Brits so their response would be to say that you're wrong in a polite manner, and let most of their anger bubble inside.

fire_of_avalon
07-27-2015, 04:26 AM
They can come to my house and we can trade passive aggressive comments while I serve them biscuits with butter and jelly.

I'll follow everything they say with "bless your heart." That'll teach em.

DK
07-27-2015, 04:42 PM
you'd all be dead because the Cornish would not accept a.) having their cream being assigned to Devon and b.) being referred to as Brits

clotted cream is not butter, it is god tier cream, nothing comes close

Mr. Carnelian
07-27-2015, 04:51 PM
you'd all be dead because the Cornish would not accept a.) having their cream being assigned to Devon and b.) being referred to as Brits

clotted cream is not butter, it is god tier cream, nothing comes close

Naturally, clotted cream is also extremely well-loved in Cornwall.

I've had clotted cream in Devon more than in Cornwall, so that's why I've been talking about Devon, perhaps incorrectly. :p

Clotted cream IS god-tier.

Shauna
07-27-2015, 04:56 PM
I've only ever had clotted cream in Glasgow, doesn't make it Glaswegian. ;)

But apparently both areas claim it (according to the internet), and I like to imagine that there have been battles fought concerning this. But the largest producer currently is in Cornwall so I suppose at this stage, they'd win.

Shorty
07-27-2015, 07:27 PM
"Clot" is too gross of a word to be involved with something as wonderful as cream. :stare: Are you people talking about cream cheese?

fire_of_avalon
07-28-2015, 02:35 AM
Nah, look at the photo again. Its clearly a cousin of butter.

fire_of_avalon
07-28-2015, 03:37 AM
Hey I wrote you a song. Fred Astaire is probably rolling over in his grave. (To the tune of Putting on the Ritz)


Have you read the thread on scones?
"Do you pronounce this like gones or owns?"
Down the page in Quina's Kitchen
There's a bit of culinary bitching
Clot cream and jammed up berries
Sweet things that cause dental caries
Some may ask "What is it?"
If you ask me, it's a biscuiiiit


If you're mean and want to start trout
I know the place you should be about
Foodie fits...
Pissin' off the Brits
Calling their cuisine by a different name
Will earn the ire of each sir and dame
They'll lose their tits...
Pissin' off the Brits

Say their chocolate's not as good as Hershey's
You'll lose evyer one of their tender mercies (they'll get cursey!)

Tell them Yorkshire pudding is just bread
They'll soon be coming for your head

Pissin' off the Brits

They would consider it quite rude and feckless
To ask them "why do y'all serve beans at breakfast?" (you're on their deathlist!)

From Devonshire or Cornwall
They'll be prepared to fight and maul
You down to bits.

Pissin' off the Brits.

Night Fury
07-28-2015, 09:47 AM
Hey I wrote you a song. Fred Astaire is probably rolling over in his grave. (To the tune of Putting on the Ritz)




Tell them Yorkshire pudding is just bread
They'll soon be coming for your head



But it isn't just bread!! *shakes fist*

Bubba
07-28-2015, 09:49 AM
Hey I wrote you a song. Fred Astaire is probably rolling over in his grave. (To the tune of Putting on the Ritz)




Tell them Yorkshire pudding is just bread
They'll soon be coming for your head



But it isn't just bread!! *shakes fist*

This is true. The last time I checked, bread was not made from flour, milk and eggs.

Night Fury
07-28-2015, 09:52 AM
If anything, it's a pancake as they're pretty much the same recipe!