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Thread: The Show Must Go On! Six Things You Didn't Know about FFVI Thread 2.0

  1. #16
    Master of Kittens Galuf's Avatar
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    "Six things you didnt know about FFVI"

    Thats alot of 6 things. ALOT

  2. #17
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    281. According to an interview with Kitase around VII's development, the development team wanted to have a scene (possibly the ending) where Relm would paint various pictures of the cast during pivotal moments in the game. What was interesting is that they wanted all the drawings to be in Amano's style. Unfortunately the hardware at the time made this impossible and the scene never left the planning stages.

    282. You know the Ten Moogles that help Lock out in the Narshe mines? Well barring Mog, the other nine all share data with one of the main party members, which means if you switch their Row, when the correct character appears, they will follow suit much like the Banon/Leo example I mentioned before.

    283. Speaking of which, there is an actual glitch in the game that lets you replace Celes with her Moogle counterpart, though said Moogle has horrible stats, locked equipment, and can't use Espers. The moogle's sprite is replaced by Celes' sprite when you reach the Opera but they are not actually switched out either.

    284. That same Moogle also has a glitch where their equipment is removed and placed into you inventory automatically when you reach the Floating Continent, despite the character no longer being in your party.

    285. Remember when I mentioned that FFVI had an unused lyrical track? Did I also mention that the track is sung by Nobuo Uematsu and the entire VI development team, or that the game's director Hiroyuki Ito wrote the lyrics? In fact I'll just let you listen to it...



    286. VI was the first entry in the series to have the soundtrack (somewhat) released in the West as part of a mail order campaign. The OST was called Kefka's Domain: The Complete Soundtrack from Final Fantasy III.

    287. Nobuo Uematsu once said that he almost quit making game music after finishing the OST for VI because he felt he had accomplished everything musically he wished to in the medium and didn't believe a future project would match the excitement he had with VI.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nobuo Uemtaus
    Final Fantasy VI was a sort of ending point for me. Not just the music, but the whole game. I thought, if I do this work for the rest of my life, how many more games will I be able to do? With the satisfaction and excitement I felt after finishing that project, I thought I had reached my primary goal, and could quit doing game music with no regrets.
    288. Did you know that Interceptor's special moves Takedown and Wild Fang are actually magic-based? The reason they do so much damage is because they ignore defense. Gives new meaning to his fan-nickname of "Interceptor the Wonder Dog"

    289. Ever wonder why the Phantom Train has an Impressario as well in the SNES version? Possibly because the Impressario we know is called Dancho in Japanese which roughly can mean "leader/commander of" and he may have originally been translated into English as Conductor (as in musical conductor) but decided that Impressario was more accurate. This may have screwed with the programming and accidentally renamed the Train Conductor to Impressario as well.

    290. The Fake Mustache is actually meant to be a shout out to the Impressario as well, since the original name of the Relic was Dancho's Mustache.
    Last edited by Wolf Kanno; 06-30-2019 at 09:50 AM.

  3. #18

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    I declare this thread awesome. I only knew like 3-4% of this stuff and I love FF6

  4. #19

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    I don´t know if this was stated here before, but....

    FF6 has several elements from the Star Wars movie series:

    You fight against an evil empire.

    Empire soldiers use helmets similar to Star Wars' stormtroopers.

    The empire soldiers names Biggs and Wedge came from 2 rebel X-Wing pilots, friends of Luke Skywalker.

    The Ultima/Atma Weapon is portrayed as a lightsaber.

    The main villain uses an old "power", forgotten by ages, towards global domination... Magic on FF6, The Force on SW.

    The main villain can use a huge planet-destroyer ray (Kefka´s Light of Judgment and Vader´s Death Star ray).

    HarvestDude™

  5. #20
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    292. In a recent interview Kitase gave for Edge Magazine on the "making of FFVI" article, Kitase revealed that Alfred Hitchcock's "The Man Who Knew Too Much" as well as other suspense films were used as inspiration to create the tension of the Opera sequence, in which the player is made aware of coming trouble but the actual cast of characters are oblivious to the danger they are falling into.

    293. In the same interview as #292, Kitase mentions that he feels that VI was the turning point of FF where future installments began to focus more on characters and their struggles.

    294. Kitase considers the train cart sequence where the party escapes the MagiTek lab to be one of the few disappointing moments for him as the tech just wasn't there to make the sequence as enthralling as the team had wanted.

    295. Kitase mentioned that his role as director in the game was to balance out the various stories the other designers had created, but admits that he may have failed in this regard as he feels Celes and Kefka's roles actually grew more important to the story than originally planned.

    296. The main reason why all the cast play slightly differently was to instill into the player a sense that they were unique individuals, to comply with the central theme of the games development being "a cast of main characters". This is also why the developers tried new mechanics in order to blend seamlessly the characters story and gameplay, citing Gau's story and his method of play working together as a cohesive whole.

    297. Kitase says the Opera sequence is his favorite part of FFVI and the scene he's the most proud of putting together.

    298. According to Kitase, Japanese fans initially struggled with the thematic changes VI introduced to the FF series compared to the earlier installments that dealt with recurring mythos like the four elemental crystals and the more high fantasy settings. Despite that, the opening sequence was very well received.

  6. #21
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    Been reading a neat article series about the differences between the various translations of FFVI. Learning some cool info and even a few things I probably should have known to begin with.

    299: There is an amusing glitch in VI I've never caught. Banon has an unfinished character sheet for riding a Chocobo, so if you make him the leader and travel to the hidden chocobo stable south of Figaro Castle, you can witness this amusing glitch.

    Attachment 75849

    300. For the most part, due to how beloved the original English translation was, SE has largely used that translation's names and spellings for the cast, with one exception: Orthros/Ultros whose name has gone back and forth from his original Greek name to his funny Woosely name in the various media he's appeared in. For reference, his name change was likely an accident caused by his name being originally a non-English foreign word which makes translating the katakana tricky for a translator if they are working on a tight deadline like Woosely was.

    301: Here's a thought experiment for players and long time vets: Have you been pronouncing Cyan's name correctly? Due to shortening his name, I'm sure most non-Japanese speaking English speakers pronounce it like the color or "Sigh-Ann" but when you look at the original romanji/spelling Cayenne, his name is actually pronounced like the tasty pepper so "Ky-Ann".

    302: The actual name of the Phantom Woods in Japanese is 迷いの森 (mayoi no mori) which has dozens of way it can be translated. Why I bring this up is because this is also what Zelda's Lost Woods, Super Mario World's Forest of Illusion area, and Pokemon's Lostlorn Forest. As you can tell, the name usually goes with ghostly woods that people get lost in.

    303: Speaking of location names, the Veldt is a Woolseyism. It's actually called "Beast Plains" in Japanese but Woosley changed it to the Afrikan word for Grasslands instead.

    304: I mentioned before that in the early pre-release screenshots for VI, Maduin was the Narshe Esper instead of Tritoch. Well it looks like a few other things were changed as well such as Narshe having a Chcocbo stable...
    narshe-before.png

    305:...and the desert battle background was different as well.
    desert-before.png
    Which is a shame because I honestly feel the early one is better looking than what we got.

    306. There is an odd translation joke in the GBA script concerning a drunk old man in Narshe who mentions seeing moogles and yeti. The quirk is two-fold. First, the character isn't actually drunk in the original Japanese. So the question is why is he now drunk in the translation? Well it turns out that in an early translation build for Woosely's SNES script, he made the character a drunk before NoA made him remove references to alcohol and drunkenness. Somehow, Slattery, the GBA translator learned about this funny touch and added it back into the new script.
    beta-ff3-ff6-sasquatch.png versus sasquatch.png

    307: The actual translation for Sabin's name is debatable. I've heard it be translated at Matthew, Mathias, and Macias. An interesting coincidence I learned while researching it is that there are two lesser known operas called "Edgar" and "Macias". Whether this is intentional is unknown, but considering who wrote these characters, it wouldn't be far fetched to believe this could be a subtle reference.

    308: Most of the non-playable characters had some odd name changes. Most of the characters tend to have straight Japanese names like Jun being turned to Arvis or Shun into Owain, but the weirdest one I found is Shadow's former partner Baram, whose actual name is Billy. You read that right, the one NPC with an actual English name had his name changed. I can't telly you why either, especially since I wouldn't be surprised if the names were suppose to be references to famous outlaws Billy the Kid and Bonnie and Clyde.

  7. #22
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    309: One thing that often gets overlooked in these games is the wealth of mythology and references found in basic item descriptions. Phoenix Down's are easy to understand but what about weirder ones like Gold Needle? Well one I can finally answer thanks to the articles I'm reading is the Green Cherry item from VI which cures the Imp/Kappa status effect and boosts Umaro's stats in battle. This item is actually a Japanese in-joke that is completely lost in translation. First off, the item is actually translated as "Kizakura" or "Yellow Cherry" in English, how it got turned into Green Cherry is anyone's guess, but the joke is that Kizakura is the name of a famous brand of sake in Japan, and during the 70s and 80s, they had a series of successful and memorable commercials where a Kappa is heavily featured and the little mythical figure sort of got stuck as being synonymous with the brand similar to frogs and Budweiser in the U.S. So it's an amusing in-joke and insight into the design teams interest. It also explains why Umaro gets such a boost from having one.

    310: This one helped me clear up something I always found confusing in the game concerning the Esper World. The original translation implied it was a separate world, like a pocket dimension or something, and I always took that at face value since we're dealing with magical beings but then it never made sense how Madonna and the Empire got into the place if it technically existed in a different dimension, unless we were pulling some Gaelic ideas about the Fair Folk into this. In the actual Japanese version, it's explained that Espers do live in the human world and simply use their magic to hide the entrance, which makes the idea of non-magic using humans stumbling into the place not so far fetched if the entrance was something like an illusionary cave wall instead.

  8. #23
    Friendship *is* magic. MJN SEIFER's Avatar
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    301: Here's a thought experiment for players and long time vets: Have you been pronouncing Cyan's name correctly? Due to shortening his name, I'm sure most non-Japanese speaking English speakers pronounce it like the color or "Sigh-Ann" but when you look at the original romanji/spelling Cayenne, his name is actually pronounced like the tasty pepper so "Ky-Ann".
    I was actually thinking about this recently, and even wondering if I should do a thread about it at some point. I knew that his Japanese name was Cayenne for years, but back then I thought it was pronounced "Kay-Ann" (both his name, and the pepper) and that Cyan was pronounced like the color, but when it recently dawned on me that the pepper is pronounced "Ky-Ann" it made me think, "Wait, did they mean for "Cyan" to be pronounced that way too?"

    I love this thread, pleased to see it's still going.

  9. #24

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    303: Speaking of location names, the Veldt is a Woolseyism. It's actually called "Beast Plains" in Japanese but Woosley changed it to the Afrikan word for Grasslands instead.
    As much as some people like to come down on Woolsey, a lot of his choices were better than just a literal translation. "Beast Plains" sounds prosaic and uninteresting. Like, wow, aptly named, but not very imaginative is it? Woolsey's choice is much better. And his comic choices are often quite good as well. Not knowing the actual Japanese script, I certainly wouldn't claim he never makes missteps, but I do think he's unfairly criticized by people who are too obsessed with literal translation over a good localization.

    By the way, it's too much of a pain to quote it but are you sure about VI being the first game in which a summon can hurt the caster? Ever try using Sylph on an undead foe? I don't remember for sure, but I think that would hurt Rydia.
    Last edited by Lord Golbez; 12-22-2018 at 02:51 AM.

  10. #25
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Golbez View Post

    As much as some people like to come down on Woolsey, a lot of his choices were better than just a literal translation. "Beast Plains" sounds prosaic and uninteresting. Like, wow, aptly named, but not very imaginative is it? Woolsey's choice is much better. And his comic choices are often quite good as well. Not knowing the actual Japanese script, I certainly wouldn't claim he never makes missteps, but I do think he's unfairly criticized by people who are too obsessed with literal translation over a good localization.
    My next post will actually address a bit of this. For the most part, while Woolsey's script has it's problems which was largely technical and dealing with NoA, his script is actually more interesting than the actual Japanese one. There's some interesting world building that doesn't actually exist in the original and a large part of why Kefka is more beloved in the West is due to how much more personality he actually crammed into him. I think it says something that several lines changes Woolsey made into the script were kept in Slattery's better translation.

    Slattery's mostly restores what Woolsey couldn't keep, but he honestly kept a lot of Woolsey's localization choices as well because Woolsey made VI a more interesting world than the original. You'll see what I mean with my next post, but if you read the article series I linked in one of my last posts, you can see that Slattery actually holds the original translation in pretty high regard and sometimes even playfully adds to it such as Locke's speech when he steals clothes in the South Figaro section. Woolsey had him rhymed when he stole from merchants but then actually translated the line when you steal from soldiers correctly from the Japanese script. Slattery kept Woolsey's rhyme scheme for the merchant clothes and made one for the soldier one just to keep the theme.

    By the way, it's too much of a pain to quote it but are you sure about VI being the first game in which a summon can hurt the caster? Ever try using Sylph on an undead foe? I don't remember for sure, but I think that would hurt Rydia.
    Actually it doesn't because Sylph doesn't use the same algorithm as the Drain/Vampire/Osmose/Psyche spells at least in the original. It's suppose to ignores Undead status. At least if the Gamefaqs algorithm faq I'm reading is to believed. Granted, I don't think the FAQ was updated after the GBA version so it's possible they changed this with the DS version going forward, I would have to do more research at that point, but I doubt they changed it since Summons usually have more player friendly mechanics than magic does. I think where the difference here is that if Sylph does do damage to you by casting it on undead, that's really more on the player, whereas Crusader/Jihad will damage you regardless of what you want.

  11. #26

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    Ah! Okay. I'm not sure if I ever tried it (I don't use Sylph much anyway and usually get it very late game -i.e. past when you need the frying pan to get it), but I sort of just assumed it worked the same as drain.

    But yeah, Crusader is kind of sucky. I never use it as a summon. At least with Merton, you can equip stuff that makes it both heal your party and hurt the enemy, which is pretty great. I'm not sure if you can even do that with Crusader. It's also a ridiculously high MP cost if memory serves for something that just might end up killing you.

  12. #27
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    Today, it's all about the opera!

    Due to the heavy amount of subtext and word play that often goes into poems and musical lyrics, regardless of language, it's virtually impossible to properly translate them into another language. This can be especially difficult with song lyrics because even translating it directly will often lead to the words no longer matching the music. So unless you were born and raised in Japan all your life, you'll never actually know for certain what the Opera lyrics really are. Suffice to say there are subtle and not so subtle differences in the lyrics among every translation.

    311: One line that has been changed in both of the official English translations that sort of removes a humorous if macabre joke is the first lyrical screw up you can make. While NoA policies give Woosley a pass on this, the Slattery one is a bit of a headscratcher. Basically the first screw up line says something along the lines of Oh Draco are you really dead/Oh Draco I hope you die. It sounds really blunt and like Maria doesn't care so it's kind of an amusing joke that got lost in translation.

    312: Lost in all of the official translations, Draco apparently comes from Castle Garū from the West, it's unknown why this detail is lost in the official translations.

    313: Ultros has a few changes that are so Japanese, it's not surprising they are lost in translation. First off, when Ultros speaks of cute girls, instead of ending with a pervy line as he usually does in the official translations, he instead makes the Japanese sound effect for blushing. This looks awkward in English, especially back in the day so it was dropped but you get to see it in his 3D appearances like XIII-2. Secondly, while Ultros does have a big ego, it's different how it's gotten across in the translations. In Japanese Ultros uses the "-sama" honorific for himself which is usually only given to people superior to you in social status like your boss, the head of your household, or a high ranking government official. Obviously this is too Japanese to translate so instead we get lines like "Octopus Royalty" in the opera scene despite the actual line being Ultros telling the audience to not boo at his bad performance because he's just an octopus and not an actor. This honorific thing also makes his verbal sparring with Relm lost in translation as well. She also uses the "-sama" honorific for herself so when they talk to each other, they're both kind of flaunting the fact they're the most important person in the room which is why Locke breaks the fourth wall when shaking his head at their nonsense.

    314: Albrook is not the actual name of the city-state in the Japanese, it's romanized to Albroog, and according to the translator I'm reading, it's likely the name is suppose to be Alburg. It's unknown why the name was changed or why it's stuck.

    315: I wasn't actually going to post this one originally because it seemed insignificant, but now that I've learned that this mistake was made twice in two different parts of the official scripts, I figure it could be an interesting faq. When Celes discusses the process for Magitek infusion, she simply mentions she was asleep during the process. This is slightly wrong, because she only talks about herself but in the original script, she actually uses the pronoun for "we" implying that multiple kids were going through the process at the same time and they were all put asleep before it. Why this becomes significant is because the same error is made when you speak to the towns person explaining Kefka's backstory. He is not the first Magitek Knight, he was one of many actually, implying there may be a whole bunch of magic wielding psychopaths from the first batch made. This is interesting to me because it shows that Magitek Infusion is an easy and mass producible process whereas the original translation implies its more laborious. This also begs the question of what happened to the other members of the first batch of Magitek Soldiers...

    316: There is no such thing as a Magitek Knight in the Japanese script. In fact, when the term "magic" comes up in the script, the game uses two different words to distinguish them: 魔法 (mahō) and 魔導 (madō). The first word deals with natural phenomena while the second deals with "something learned" and this one is the term used when discussing Magitek infused characters which is usually the word 魔導士 (madōshi). To give you an idea of how much more interesting flavor text is used in the English scripts, madoshi is usually translated into English as wizard/sorcerer which kind of undercuts some of the Sci-Fi elements and also explains the inconsistency with Kefka's "job" in the translated scripts where he's referred to as both a Court Mage and Magitek Knight. So basically, in the Japanese script, the empire is making wizard/mages, while in the English, they're producing Magiteck Knights. I feel it's safe to say we got the cooler name scheme.

    317: Likewise, the term "Relic" is not actually used when discussing the items in the original script, they're simply called Accessories. Woosley used the term Relic to give them some more significance. Slattery opted to keep this in and personally I like building up their importance cause it gives the game some interesting lore despite not really being there in the original. Again, these last few entries go to show how much more interesting the English script makes this game compared to the Japanese one and why localization can be just as important as accurate translations.

    318: One area the Japanese script does have a little more personality than the English scripts is with some of the very minor nameless NPC's in the game. There are a few who speak with an Osaka dialect such as the Engineer at Castle Figaro, and the Merchant Ghost on the Phantom Train, but since that's hard to translate, the scripts opted to leave it out. I'm not too sore though because usually when English translations try to convey this, it means we wind up with characters speaking with thick southern accents or Brooklyn accents.

    319: Similar to 316 and 317, the term Magicite is also an embellishment on the actual term, but unlike the previous entries, the term used in Japanese 魔石 (maseki), can actually be translated a number of different ways and most translators do add some flair to the term. The easiest translation given and one used in the Japanese source books is Magic Stone, which sounds really generic and boring. Technically Magicite isn't incorrect as it conveys the same meaning, so it's not wrong but we could have ended up with a very different term as well.

    320: Ramuh, Shiva, and Ifrit are actually siblings in VI. This line was dropped in the first translation but was restored in the GBA one.

    321: Lost in all translations is how much stronger Magicite power is compared to Cid's Esper extraction process. When he witnesses magicite for the first time, he has a line explaining magicite is hundreds of times stronger than his own process. Explains why the party's magic power is stronger than the generic soldiers I guess.

    322: Celes' speaking style changes in the Japanese script. She speaks very formal and sternly at first, but once she puts on the opera dress she starts using feminine particles more often and they slowly pop up more and more as the game goes on. This is obviously difficult to convey in English. If she had a VA, chances are she would go from a military style soldier speak to a more casual and possibly overly feminine speech as time goes on.

    323: There is another location with an odd name change that stayed in both English localization for some reason. Strago's home is located on Crescent Island in the English script, but the actual name of the place is Big Triangle Island, if you even look at the location on a map, it makes sense because the landmass is an awkward triangle shape. Don't know why this one wasn't fixed in the GBA script.

    324: Here's another character name we may have all been pronouncing wrong. While her name in all Japanese media is romanized as Relm, when you look at her actual Japanese spelling リルム (rirumu) it's very likely her name should be Reelm. So if you've been saying it like realm, like I do, we're probably wrong.

    325: Of all the party members, the one who probably went through the most significant changes due to the Woolsey script is Relm. In the old script, she's a smart mouth bratty half pint with a heart of gold. In the original, and somewhat in the Slattery script, she's restored closer to the Japanese version where she's kind of overly childish. Though she's pretty arrogant in all versions so one part is consistent. She speaks in the third person, bringing us back to the fact she uses the -sama honorific for herself. So anytime she uses a pronoun for herself, like "I want to go too" she's actually saying "Relm want to go too" this is an odd characteristic that is popular in Japanese media for young girl characters, but is often removed in English translations for one reason or another. I'm personally happy for it because it would have made her really grating to be around.

    326: What's Kefka's catch phrase? Well if you were in the US and familiar with the Woolsey script, you would likely be arguing with a bunch of FFVI nerds on which one of his many memorable lines should be his catch phrase. I'm partial to his Hate speech on the Floating Continent. If you were a Japanese fan though, it's a line he uses while he's temporarily in prison and when he's doing the Thamasa Esper massacre where he uses the shock sprite emote and says something along the lines of "I don't believe this!". It's actually used in a lot of trailers, marketing and even some merchandise for the character in Japan. Makes me wonder if Japanese fans associate Kefka with another bumbling villain with similar catch phrase.

    327: Edgar's quirky exchange with Relm in Thamasa is actually a bit funnier in the Japanese. While I feel most Western fans got the gist of what was really transpiring here, the Japanese script just lays it out with Edgar's line being something along the lines of "Yeah, that would defintely be a crime... better just forget about it." The Japanese script plays up the fact Edgar will hit on anything without a Y chromosome regardless of age, but I think we all knew that...

  13. #28
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    328: Want to know another fan joke about FFVI? There is an enemy in the Esper Cave segment whom know one seems to get what this enemy is actually called. Fans of the original SNES script know it as Ing while it got renamed Outcast in the GBA one.

    Attachment 75858

    It's actual name is ロゲノイア (rogenoia) which is katakana and likely a non-English word to begin with. Here's where the joke comes in. Some Japanese fans learned that if you write his name backwards, it becomes アイノゲロ (ainogero) which can be rougly translated as "Vomit of Love" which ended up becoming a fan nickname that stuck.

    329: Going back to locations that have different names between versions. The Disc 1 Final Dungeon known to western fans as the "Floating Continent" goes by a different name in Japan. Within the game, it's called the 魔大陸 (matairiku) or Magic Continent roughly. While the romanization of the name in the Japanese guide books call it the Enchanted Continent.

    330: So what does Kefka actually say during his infamous "Hate" Speech in Japanese? This is actually one of the few lines that has never been properly translated into English. In Japanese he says ちくしょう (chikushō) which has like thirty different meanings and is basically a word most English translators use for English swearing. Hence why a lot of fan translations tend to make this just Kefka shouting "bitch, smurf, and trout" over and over. Course this line can be translated as anything mild as "blast it" to the penultimate cuss word of smurf, so this line really varies based on the context of the scene and the person translating it. Now the one part that is lost in translation among the official scripts is that Kefka gets wore out/breaks down halfway through the rant and stops fully saying the word. So a decent translation could be him saying "Damn it!" and then halfway through he simply says damn. For me personally, this is one of the few translation changes in the GBA script where I wish Slattery had stuck with the old translation.

    331: Two words that have weird translations in the SNES script are Atma/Ultima and Merton/Meltdown. What's interesting is that they are not entirely incorrect. The actual Japanese for these lines can really be translated as Altema and Melton. The Japanese uses a strange katakana for these words as the game doesn't use the traditional spelling for these words like in other media. While it's easy to see in hindsight what they were actually going for, it's not difficult to see how the translator just directly translated the words and left them. In fact, the SNES translation does seem to recognize that Atma/Ultima was a thing because the spell Ultima uses the same awkward katakana, so either Atma was a placeholder name that never got fixed because the translation got rushed or it's a conscious choice to differentiate it from the spell.

    332: The World of Balance and the World of Ruined is an English phenomena. The Japanese version and fans have no real official or unofficial title to distinguish the first half of the game from the second. Oddly enough the phrases are never actually mentioned in-game and instead comes from various maps used in English guide books which just stuck with the fans and blew up once the internet became more prominent. It's likely why some fans found the PSX port's bestiary weird since it uses the term Cataclysm instead to differentiate the two parts of the game.

    wob.jpg wor.jpg

    333: There is a piece of NPC dialogue changed between the SNES version and the GBA version. In the first town where Celes reunites with Sabin in the WoR, the original game has an NPC who talks about a few of the new status effects you'll be dealing with in the second half of the game such as Zombie. In the GBA port, his dialogue is changed to foreshadowing Humbaba attacking Mobliz. No idea why this was changed.

    334: The band of thieves Gerad/Edgar leads in the WoR have no name, the SNES translation calls them the "Crimson Robbers" and the GBA script keeps this.

    335: Speaking of which, Edgar's cover name in Japanese is the awesomely exotic and totally the name of a badass leader of cut-throat criminals "Jeff". Yeah, glad that got changed.

    336: Another thing lost in translation concerning Edgar's personality and way of speaking is that he often uses English words in his speech. This is how Celes sees through his disguise in Japanese. This is another Japanese thing with characters that often gets lost in translation. In anime and manga, authors tend to distinguish rich and smart characters by having them use fancy foreign words a lot, usually English. Mitsuru Kirijo from Persona 3 is a wonderful example as she uses a lot of English in her speech in Japanese and uses French in the English translation. In the English translations, Edgar simply speaks more formally instead, so the whole thing actually works well regardless.

    337: Gogo's gender is never revealed in the game, but oddly enough, Gogo uses male pronouns in Japanese and there is a Japanese guide book that refers to Gogo as a "he".
    gogohe.jpg
    As an added bonus, Gogo has also made a cameo in a less known Square-Enix series called Hanjuku Hero.

  14. #29

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    I looked up "ちくしょう" on RomajiDesu and got basically "beast ", "brute", "son of a bitch/damn it !"


    You could translate that maybe as " Damn it, damn it, damn it, damn it, damn it, damn it, damn it !"


    imo, that makes a lot more sense than just saying "hate" over and over.




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  15. #30
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    Hate wasn't a bad choice considering how often Kefka used it in the original script. Damn it seems like the best choice, especially with the breakdown part missing from the official scripts.

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