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Thread: WK's Top something or other... let's just say "games" and call it good list.

  1. #76
    Witch of Theatergoing Karifean's Avatar
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    Now this one I have played, albeit in its Gameboy Advance iteration. I have a lot of fond memories of it. I *always* used Luigi though =P

  2. #77
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    76.Meet my first, and probably the oldest RPG I have ever played. Long before Secret of Mana, Final Fantasy, or even playing Zelda; my dad enticed me into playing this little gem due to knowing my absolute love for giant robots. This game is set in the Battletech/Mechwarrior series universe, a popular tabletop/minatures RPG/Tactical Warfare franchises from the 80s and early 90s. Battletech takes place in the distant future of the 32nd century. Mankind has expanded into outer space with the Terran Alliance. Unfortunately, much like any great empire, the Terran Alliance couldn't control the farther space colonies and a combination of corruption, illegal expansion, and political power consolidation led to the weakening of the Terran Alliance and the rise of several powerful political houses that controlled different sections of the empire. The Star League was formed shortly after, and mankind entered a Golden Age of technology and prosperity. The five great houses turned on the Terran Hegemony controlled by House Cameron who also controlled the Star League, and eventually the house collapsed and its territory gobbled up by the other great houses. This severely weakened the Star League as houses competed with each other over territory. The independent Star League Defense Force grew tired of the in-fighting, and when Commanding General Aleksandr Kerensky realized the Houses were about to plunge the League into bloody conflict, opted to take his forces and leave the League all together into the outer frontier zones of the galaxy. With the main military gone, and the ruling house in collapse, the five great houses began the Succession Wars, which saw the rise of Battlemechs, giant humanoid tanks capable of immense destruction. These wars went on for centuries and with the end of the Third Succession Wars, the various colony worlds had not only been reduced to a future version of feudalism, but the houses had almost knocked each other back to the stone age technologically. The modern era can no longer recreate the advanced technology of their golden age, and thus, families who had control of a Battlemech were highly valuable to continue on the wars for the various lords, and undisturbed cache from the Star League era was worth destroying entire planets for. So yeah, basically future version of the post-Roman Empire Europe. There is a crap ton more information concerning the houses, the various smaller lords, and which mechas are associated with which house, but for the sake of space, I'll leave all that for you to read elsewhere.The game takes place on the planet Pcifica (Chara III) and takes place just before the political marriage between House Davion and House Steiner, which will eventually set off the Fourth Succession War. You play Jason Youngblood, a cadet at the MechWarrior Academy on the world and the son of Jeremiah Youngblood, a famous Mechwarrior during the Third Succession Wars who fought in the Kell Hounds unit before being personally asked to run Katrina Steiner's Crescent Hawk unit, which were almost her personal guard. He spends his time now serving House Steiner and looking for old Star League cache's for them. When Katrina Steiner stops by Pacifica for a visit on her journey to her daughter's wedding, Jeremiah is asked to head security detail and reunites with his son at the academy. House Draconis, opposed to the marriage, attacks the planet and takes over. Jason is doing a mock battle in the arena when four Draconis Jenner's attack him and he now has to use his new skills to fight for his life and escape. Katrina safely makes it off the planet but Jeremiah disappears in the confusion and the planet comes under Draconis rule. Jason is forced to go into hiding but eventually encounters Rex, a member of the now scattered Crescent Hawks. The two band together and seek out the other members of the unit and begin fighting a guerrilla war against the Draconis Combine and House Kurita. Eventually Jason and Rex learn that the Draconis had learned that Jeremiah had found an old Star League cache on the world and kept it hidden, which was the real reason for the invasion and the game quickly becomes a race to find and access the cache first. This game was developed by Westwood Studios, whom some of you may know as the Studio that created the Command and Conquer franchise in the 90s. It was also published by Infocom of Zork fame. So its no surprise that his game has a bit of a heavier focus on story and narrative than usual, which works out pretty well considering how much backstory the series has from the tabletop books. The game actually offers a lot of different elements despite its crude design, the game begins before the invasion proper, so you spend your time living on the Academy campus, placing your money in the futures screwy bank system, talking to NPCs and your dad as well as taking exams so you can finally take the final mechwarrior exam that deals with a mock battle. During the mock battle is when the invasion begins and battles properly begin. Battles are turn based, but you also have the option of moving your units around on the field to either gain cover in terrain or to move in closer and boost your weapon accuracy. Battles can be against human opponents or even other Battlemechs but depending on how the battle goes, you can salvage the enemy mechs and eventually outfit your whole unit with them, though it can get expensive and its always possible that you'll lose your own mechs for good in battle. There are only a small handful of mechs available in the game, but oddly enough, the best one is the one you get in the mock battle. Course you're guaranteed to lose it in the fight with the Jenners (also rare mechs you can only acquire by chance if you win this battle) and the safest option is to actually target the arena and blow yourself an escape route and simply run. The bulk of the game is wandering the planet and trying to acquire the rest of the unit while avoiding or battling Draconis troops in the fields or towns. In the various cities you can repair your mechs, buy gear, go into taverns to collect information. There is a great deal of flavor text when communicating with the townspeople or other party members and the game does a pretty good job of creating a really cool narrative for a game that makes Dragon Quest 1 looks like Final Fantasy XV in comparison. The game switches modes again in the third act, when your party finds the Star League cache and have to get past the security systems, which oddly enough is all about puzzle solving instead of combat. Some argue its a bit anti-climatic, but I appreciate the change up.For a game made in 1988 for DOS, it's a surprisingly well done experience and it introduced me to the wonderful world of Battletech and Mechwarrior. O anything, the game is probably too small for such a narrative, but works well as an gateway entry into the series. The game received a sequel called Battletech: The Crescent Hawk's Revenge, which still has you playing as Jason during the Fourth Succession War and into the Clan Invasions. The game unfortunately drops most of the RPG elements and takes on a bit of a more RTS feel.

    If you can find an old retro website to play this game, I recommend it as the franchise is pretty cool and game is pretty solid if a bit on the easy side of things. Still one of my favorite games from childhood. Fun fact: Many of the mechs in this game are unavailable in the series proper now, due to FASA Corp (the creators of Battletech and Shadowrun) using mecha design from various animes they acquired in the 80s by poor liscensing standards, many of which are from Macross as you can tell from the screenshots.

  3. #78
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    I'll do my next entry a bit later, but I will say now that I kind of made an error on my list, and in hindsight the next game really shouldn't be this high. I can pretty much say for certain that 100-75 were kind of put in order a bit haphazardly, and the next entry is a prime example, because as I began writing the assessment for it, it dawned on me that I'm not as partial to this game as I am to a number of titles that has come before it. If I could do this again, I would actually rank the next title at #100 because the game is largely on this list for pure nostalgia as opposed to quality. Though I'll give a banana sticker to anyone who actually knows this game because it's pretty damn obscure.

  4. #79
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    75. (Really #100)Once upon a time, before they became the EA of Japan and were largely known for that one game, Konami was known for their high quality beat em up arcade games, many of which were licensed games, and Konami did for Licensed games in the arcade, what Capcom did for them on console. They rocked them out. Of course, every once in awhile, Konami did something daring and made an original title. Mystic Warriors: Wrath of the Ninjas is such a game.It's a bit hard to really explain the premise here. You and three of your friends can play up to four the main game's five playable characters, who all pretty much hit every martial art stereotype such as the Hanzo look alike gut that SNK totally didn't notice, a Kabuki knock off, the rough looking tough guy, the token girl for sex appeal, and the random American black guy who came to Japan to learn martial arts and do hip hop. After you choose a character, an evil Ninja from a rival school breaks into the Dojo and kidnaps one of the characters you didn't select, and thus the story begins with your party trying to rescue their fellow student from a cyborg ninja clan that would make Shredder proud. Despite being martial arts fighters, the game actually is a re-skin of Sunset Riders on closer inspection and your party basically fight by throwing shuriken from their infinite bag of holding. The stages themselves are absolutely hilarious with the first stage being a city since the dojo is apparently in a skyscraper somewhere in Ninjaville, and the boss of the stage is fought at a drive in theater (remember those? No? Okay I feel old) and he's a flamethrower dude that looks like a rejected G.I. Joe villain. Later stages include a ski level, an underwater cavern, a science lab filled with terminator knockoffs, and a train sequence obviously inspired by Temple of Doom. What made this game stand out for me, besides spending the better part of afternoon getting my ass kicked playing through it, was that in the science lab base, you finally rescue your lost comrade and the game shifts to escaping the bad guy hideout during the train level. The boss of this stage is a bulltrout robot on an opposing train track that will eventually capture your party in a force field, at which point, the rescued comrade performs a heroic sacrifice to destroy it and free your party. With your journey lost, your party vows revenge and the later stages focus on the group deciding to take down the badguys. I can't really put it into words, but I found something quite profound in a story about rescuing someone and ultimately failing, but only due to their selfless sacrifice to return the favor of coming for them. Perhaps because I had never really seen a game do that before and that one element really made this game stick out in my mind. In fact it was only a few years ago I even found out what the game was called because I only ever played it two or three times before that arcade shut down. Despite not being a particularly special title from a gameplay perspective, I love the narm charm of the premise, and that one moment is probably one of my favorite arcade moments I ever had. Still, it's a pretty solid game on its own with a killer soundtrack because Konami did damn good back in the day. Like all of the arcade games featured on this list, and there will be more, this is definitely one of those games that I would tack down for my dream arcade I hope to make one day.


  5. #80
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    74.Meet my favorite original IP for the DS. The World Ends With You was a quirky, "blink and you missed it" title, that Square-Enix released in the mid-2000s great reviews and so-so sales. It was developed by the same team that worked on Kingdom Hearts:Chain of Memories on GBA but directed and written by a new team. The game began it's life when Nintendo asked Square-Enix to make a unique RPG specifically for their new DS unit coming out in a few months. After testing the product out, this game started as a means to improve CoM's battle system but eventually evolved into its own unique style. TWEWY is the story about Neku, a loner who cuts himself off from other people and has a pretty negative outlook on life. The story begins when an amnesiac Neku finds himself at Shibuya which is overrun by monsters called Noise. He has a strange timer on his handand everyone around him seems oblivious to the monsters and Neku himself. He meets a girl named Shiki, who dreams of being a fashion designer and is caught in a similar situation as Neku. They form a pact and become partners in order to defeat the Noise, using special pins that grant various powers. It turns out the two are in the Game. A week long tournament for the newly dead against the Shinigami of whom the winner gets to come back to life and the others are erased from existence. To enter this tournament, you have to sacrifice something important to you, which for Neku, was his memories. Initially cold to Shiki and the other contestants, the week proves to be a growing experience for Neku, who eventually learns to open up and actually start caring about people.The story of this game is pretty awesome and Neku finds himself in a role similar to Squall Leonheart; and his growth over the course of the story is quite remarkable. I mean I say it's similar to Squall, but Squall comes off just quiet and occasionally unpleasant compared to jerk-ass Neku, of whom I almost didn't finish the game because of his awful personality in the beginning. Thankfully, the rest of the cast is much more endearing. Shiki is Neku's opposite, kind, empathetic, and understanding. You'll want to punch Neku in the beginning due to his dickish attitude with her. Rhyme and Beat make an amusing duo with Beat being a blusterous wannabe badass who talks in 90s street lingo and Rhyme is his kind and friendly partner. Joshua is a smug ass, but is absolutely wonderful for basically putting Neku through the same BS he puts everyone else through, so he quickly became one of my faves in the game. The Reapers themselves are a colorful cast of literal punch-clock villains who are simply going through the ropes of the game. A few take it super seriously, but several of the Reapers act like the Turks from VII and will sometimes not bother the heroes due to being on their lunch break, at which point they bitch to each other about work and needing a vacation. It's actually hard to find anyone in this game who is completely unlikable. You may hate Neku in the beginning, but by the end of the game, you're seriously rooting for him. It's a bit interesting how well Neku actually works as a player avatar (though he's not a silent protagonist) due to the story structure. You feel very cold towards him in the first part like he is to everyone else, you share his desire and frustrations in the second part because you're both now emotionally invested in the cast, and certainly feel his anger and want to bring the whole damn system to the ground by the third part. Gameplay is a unique experience, and I will say now, that everything I love about the gameplay is pretty much everything that most people seem to hate about it. This was a game that was truly designed to show off every feature the DS had to offer. For many people, this is a very gimmicky game, but for me, the difference between a gimmick and a feature is whether you like it or not and for me, this game is simply filled with awesome features. The game utilizes both screens in combat, Neku and his partner play on different screens and even have different input methods with Neku's controls being exclusive to the touchscreen and his partners being connected to the D-Pad. Fights can get really chaotic, but the partner has a limited A.I. that will take the burden of watching both screens constantly, but after awhile, you do develop a type of rhythm with the gameplay mechanics that makes using both screens more functional. Part of this is because of the Puck mechanic, where each player has an energy puck they pass back and forth to control damage output and build a super meter to unleash a powerful attack on all enemies. The other Neku's controls are the most important and versatile, as his partner's usually works about the same way with using the D-Pad to switch between combo chains. Neku uses various Pins you can collect that do different spells and effects. These abilities also have different inputs that utilize the DS features but most fall into classes so there is really only about six or seven input methods total over about 30+ pins. For instance, Neku can send a fire wave attack against enemies by drawing a line over the enemy. Lightning spells need him to simply tap on the enemy to summon a bolt against them. There is a Quake spell that requires you to shake the DS to activate, and there are even a few that require you to use the microphone to shout at the screen. It all sounds silly, and certainly curbs the game's appeal to be played in public, but I quite enjoyed the novelty and inspiration for it all. Neku can be outfitted with several pins, but the pins have cool down effects, so you'll need to balance out his abilities so you're not just running around the screen avoiding enemies while waiting for all of your pins to recharge. Pins level up by three different methods, and once leveled up, they will either transform into a stronger version of themselves, or even evolve into a completely different type of Pin. This all depends on which of the three XP tables was completed first. The first is basic battling, win battles and the Pin gains XP. The second involves the DS' online component and depends on how many people you pass with a DS on, and the third is simply by how long you don't play the game. Shutting off for awhile will actually give XP to your stuff. Obviously the online component is hit or miss and like many of the DS online gimmick features, favors Japan over everyone else, since encountering someone with a DS is not terribly difficult over there compared to the U.S. and Europe. I still love the different input methods and it really does make you purchase multiples of the same pins just to see what they will evolve into.Being set in Shibuya, Japan's major fashion district and cool kids town, means that fashion plays a huge role in the game. Sadly, clothing doesn't alter appearance, but clothing is separated by brand, and in a weird gang related gameplay element, wearing certain brands in certain areas of the game will improve or weaken their ability. You can actually raise a brand's popularity in a district by wearing it while completing lots of battles but this may lower other brand's appeal that you can get later, so even equipment becomes a bit of a balancing act. Course I found this wasn't as big of a deal as the game lets on, and usually their is comparable gear of every brand, so switching outfits on the fly to take advantage of this is usually not that big of a headache.What's really cool is the game's player focused features. You can adjust he game's difficulty on the fly, which at the time was unheard of in a console game. So players finding the battle system overwhelming or a difficult boss can power the game down to keep advancing. Difficulty mostly affects drop rates and the items you can get from monsters, so only a completionist would care to beef up the difficulty. The game also has a radio feature that lets you change the background music to any of the game's kick ass song selection. You can even just keep it on repeating that one infectious (of many) ear worm. I will also point at this time that the game has a really cool aesthetic style and really drives home how much I love Tetsuya Nomura's more heavy manga style over his pseudo-realism designs from FFVIII, X, and XIII. It all really fits with the game's setting and gameplays feaures focusing on a heavy dose of style. The game also a pretty humorous post-game (which I still need to finish) that unlocks special story scenes that took place during the game main game and alter the story a bit. So the game does a pretty good job of keeping you hooked. Overall, I feel this is one of those rare gems, everyone should definitely check out and it is one of my favorite games to come out of the Square-Enix era.


  6. #81
    Witch of Theatergoing Karifean's Avatar
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    Playing this game right now on my phone. I'm only up to the third day so far though so I've still got a ways to go.

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    I've been meaning to start a third playthrough of TWEWY, only problem is I can't decide if I want to haul my DS everywhere with me, or get the Android port... wait, only the DS version has "Lullaby For You", nevermind. I wasn't expecting this game to stick with me the way it did; I hadn't played Chain of Memories at the time, and I remember wanting to pass over it for 358 days/2. Glad I didn't
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  8. #83
    card mod ur face Rocket Edge's Avatar
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    Sweet. How have I not noticed this until now? I'll be following this closely. Wolfy, seeing as FFVIII is my favourite game of all time and all, be kind to it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Del Murder View Post
    You are inspiring me to make my own version of these top 100 lists. I think we'll have a lot of overlap, and our Number 1 is probably the same game. However, I guarantee you Jamma Lamma or whatever it's called will not be on my list!
    Do it. I love these kinds of threads!

  9. #84
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    73.Here's a game that was forced onto me by my, at the time, closet furry friend who knew how much I love stealth games. He lent me the first two entries in the series and I pretty much had a blast with both of them. The first game is mostly going to get the spotlight due to being the tighter designed game, but I did love the second game's semi-open world, Ocean's 11 vibe it had going for it. I just wish the game wasn't so damn long because I got seriously burnt out by the end, but maybe I should give it another spin one of these days. Developed by Sucker Punch of InFamous... fame? Sly Cooper is a stealth platformer that feels like an odd combo of 3D Mario and Metal Gear. You play as the title character Sly, who comes from a long line of gentlemen thieves who primarily steal from other thieves. Obviously, stealing from people who tend to do more reprehensible things to acquire that wealth, may not have been the smartest thing. So Sly lost his parents at a young age when several old family enemies banded together, murdered Sly's parents, and stole the Theivius Racconus, a compendium containing both the Cooper history as well as all of their awesome thieving techniques. Sent to an orphanage, Sly meets his two life long friends Bentley and Murray, and the three of them grow up to become a premiers thief group. The story largely deals with Sly tracking down the bad guys who killed his parents and trying to recollect all the pages of his family's book. The game structure is very similar to Mario 3, with each boss having a themed dungeon location. Sly has to do an initial break into the fortress but once in, the main map simply leads to rooms that load the real levels much like Mario 64. You can play the levels in any order, but most of them pertain to a long winded strategy to get the bosses attention or access to their room in some ways, so one stage might be finding blueprints, another can be hitting the generator powering the security system and so on. Completing the stages will unlock a time attack mode as well which completing opens up some cool extra features as well. Stages combine the usual platformer elements like collectible coins, some power-ups, and special bottles that contain clues for Bentley to decipher the combination locks in stages that contain a piece of Sly's family book. Despite the collectibles and trick jumps, Sly is still very much a stealth title, though a pretty easy one compared to more traditional entries in the genre. With that said, it makes it's point about utilizing stealth to succeed, very quickly. While Sly can give a good beating, he can't take a hit and will go down in one blow unless you've acquired one of the horseshoe power-ups that allow him to take two or three hits. He also suffers from Sonic syndrome and can't swim to save his life. You'll need to sneak around and ambush guards but Sly will open up his repertoire of abilities as you collect more pages of his Family book. The stealth angle adds a cool dynamic to the level design as you have the MGS element of looking secret ways around the various guards and obstacles, but you have a stealthy Mario's mobility. It creates a much more thrilling platform experience for me and there are several stages that focus on that almost sadistic Olympic level of precision to complete. One of the last pure platform stages in the last area is quite memorable because it tests how well you know every one of Sly's thief skills and platforming ability. There are also a few unique stages ripped straight out of MMX where Carmelita, Sly's female Interpol adversary/love interest, will chase him around a stage, using her overpowered tun gun to wreck the stage, at which point the level is about speed and keeping an eye out for the useful collectibles. The bosses are usually more of gimmicky affair and include a wide-variety of styles to make them each unique. My favorite is the Bayou Witch, whose battle is a Rhythm game similar to the defensive mode of Gitaroo Man. They help get around the fact poor Sly can't really do well in a protracted fight. The real draw of this game is the fantastic characters. Sly is a genuinely suave version of Lupin III, and while Murray is just the dumb muscle/driver, Bentley is a hilarious combination of Colonel Campbell and Otacon from the MGS series, and there are a ton of references and gags making fun of MGS and the stealth genre. Every level is bookend by great story sequences that flesh out the villains and cast, as well as tell you wacky adventures the group had to go through just to get to the next level. The animation is simply, but gets the job done. Besides the obvious benefit of getting more abilities for Sly, the other fun part of collecting them all is listening to Bentley's hilarious solutions to the alleged "clues" of which you never actually read, but makes you wonder about the bad guys. The bantering during levels is fun and ultimately helps endear you to the game's quirky and fun cast of characters. Overall, if you love stealth games, and you like mascot platformers, you should definitely give this series a look into because it was super fun and was sadly a bit overshadowed by rival mascot franchises like Jak and Ratchet and Clank. Here's a taste of what to expect.


  10. #85
    Feel the Bern Del Murder's Avatar
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    I don't think SE has made a better game than TWEWY since its release 10 years ago.

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    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    72. Oh yeah, the Gamboy's original killer app. I played the hell out of this game and to date, I still consider this to be one of the most addictive puzzle games on the market. There really isn't much to say about it though since most people it's just about moving blocks to form lines and make them disappear for points. The game has a killer soundtrack as well, which most people know.What is kind of interesting about this game is that it's one of the few super popular Nintendo titles (at least back in the day) that Nintendo had nothing to do with its creation. It was actually developed by Alexey Leonidovich Pajitnov a programmer in the former U.S.S.R. who designed it to give him something to do while he had downtime at work. He kept making copies of it for friends, until one of them got smuggled out of the country and eventually found it's way to Nintendo, who wanted it for their new Gameboy system. There was a bit of a legal issue obviously, but we know Nintendo kind of got their way in the end. The programmer in question became a game developer after the wall fell in 89. He designed for Nintendo, Microsoft, and even formed his own company, at which point he was able to finally receive royalties for his creation. Overall, I really love this game, and make sure I never download it onto my hone or browser cause it would destroy what little free time I have. It encompasses what I love about a good puzzle title, being simple to understand but difficult to master. It also has more of a twitch element to it than something like a jigsaw puzzle, which I also like.

  12. #87
    Feel the Bern Del Murder's Avatar
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    Tetris deserves a spot on anyone's Top 100 list.

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  13. #88
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    I only got into Tetris recently, but it is SUPERB. It's my go to multiplayer game after burning out on fighting games.

    I got a PS2 for Jak and Daxter, but the Sly Trilogy is my favorite Mascot platformer series ever. WK, did you ever play the third one? It takes the second game's open world structure, but adds a ton more variety. It's also MUCH shorter, more vibrant, and the variety in environments is spectacular. Revisiting the trilogy, it's since become my favorite.
    Returners Represent!

  14. #89
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    I never got to the third entry for one reason or another, but I'll probably pick it up eventually.

    The next entry will be up in a bit.

  15. #90
    Memento Mori Site Contributor Wolf Kanno's Avatar
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    71. Well time to talk about the last SEGA title on this list. I actually really love a lot of SEGA titles, but growing up predominately with Nintendo and Sony consoles means my exposure to their games is rare outside of the arcade scene. I still have a playthrough of Phantasy Star 1 I need to get back to. So yeah, I'm still playing catch up with SEGA titles so I apologize for the little representation they will receive on this list cause I know they've made some good trout. While most of the screenshots are from Sonic 1, that's due to being the one I've had the most personal time with in recent memory. I've played a bit of all of the classic 2D entries. Thus this entry will largely be talking about the Pre-3D era of the mascot character in general. Sonic was a series I was always infatuated with growing up, the graphics looked better than Mario, the soundtrack had more of a beat, and the gameplay combined good platforming with the sporadic exhilaration of watching Sonic blast through the stage with speed. My only time to really play the series was on the rare occasion a local game shop had one of the games on demo, and whenever I had a sleep over with a friend who happened to own a Genesis. In fact, I often associate this series with a few of my friends from childhood. One in particular was so obsessed at the time that he used to draw his own characters and I would lend him magazines with featured articles about the games. I remember us pouring over GamePro's Sonic 3 guides over lunch break just so he could figure out all of the alternate paths.When I got into RPGs, I drew away from platformers and ended up spending more time with out mutual friend (who pretty much did everything in his power to get me into JRPGs) and eventually we went out separate ways gaming-wise. Years later, I finally picked up the Sonic collection for PS2 when I was on a nostalgia kick and started playing through the first game again. I got stuck in the Labyrinth Zone boss battle but overall, I had a blast with the game and was a bit disappointed in myself for not jumping back into the series sooner. Sonic is largely here on this list due to nostalgia rather than me talking about level design or how awesome the games are. They are awesome games and I recommend checking out the classics, but for me, the series simply takes me back to a more innocent time in my life and a good friend from elementary school. Also, if you've never watched the anime "movie" made in the 90s, you should definitely check it out.




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